Bird

American Crow

American Crow

Crows are a member of the corvid family, along with ravens, jays, magpies, and rooks. American crows can be seen throughout urban and rural areas as these highly adaptable birds have done very well cohabitating areas with humans. American crows are highly social...

Augur Buzzard

Augur Buzzard

This strikingly-plumaged raptor is closely related to our red-tailed hawks here in North America and occupies a similar ecological niche. Augurs are one of the highest-flying of all birds, preferring high-altitude habitats and frequently sighted soaring between 6,000...

Bald Eagle

Bald Eagle

Although they are the U.S.'s national bird, bald eagles were once threatened with extinction due to poaching, habitat loss, and exposure to pesticides such as DDT. Widely used as an agricultural insecticide, DDT began affecting eagles through a process called...

Eurasian Collared Dove

Eurasian Collared Dove

Eurasian collared doves get their name from the black ‘collar’ pattern on their feathers. They are slightly larger than the mourning dove, which is native to the U.S. This bird was introduced in the Bahamas and the Lesser Antilles when a few pet birds inadvertently...

Eurasian Eagle Owl

Eurasian Eagle Owl

Eurasian eagle owls are one of the largest species of owls in the world; while great gray owls have longer bodies and Blakiston’s fish owls are often heavier, Eurasian eagle owls have the largest wingspan. They are widespread throughout many parts of Europe, Asia, and...

European Starling

European Starling

European Starlings, also known as Common Starlings, or just Starlings in parts of Europe, are one of the most numerous and successful birds in the world. They have long, sharp beaks, triangular wings, and glossy green-black feathers. They are highly adaptive, which...

Ferruginous Hawk

Ferruginous Hawk

The ferruginous hawk is the largest hawk species in North America. Their name comes from the Latin word “ferrum,” meaning iron, for the rust-colored patches on their wings. Unlike most hawks, they have feathers extending all the way down their legs. Because of their...

Great Horned Owl

Great Horned Owl

The great horned owl is the most common owl of the Americas, easily identified by the iconic feather tufts on its head. While these are often referred to as horns or ears, they are actually just feather tufts called “plumicorns.” It’s thought that they help with...

Greater Rhea

Greater Rhea

Although rheas look very similar to their larger cousin the ostrich, there are several differences, including their size, toes, and child-rearing habits. Rheas’ plumage is typically in shades of gray and brown, with white underneath. Where ostriches have two toes on...

King Vulture

King Vulture

A distinctive bird, the king vulture is easily recognized. The wings are short and quite broad and from the neck down the birds are white with a black band running along the rear edge of the wings. A small collar of feathers at the base of the neck is blackish-gray...

Peregrine Falcon

Peregrine Falcon

These falcons are formidable hunters that prey on other birds (and bats) in mid-flight. Peregrines hunt from above and, after sighting their prey, drop into a steep, swift dive that can top 230 miles an hour. This makes them the fastest animal on the planet. Peregrine...

Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Crane

Although sandhill cranes are found mostly in Canada and Alaska during the summer, these migratory birds pass through the western United States in flocks of up to 10,000 individuals! These birds are wetland specialists, wading through marshes to forage for plants,...

Turkey Vulture

Turkey Vulture

Although vultures often have a bad reputation, they are a vital part of a healthy ecosystem. Vultures are obligate scavengers, meaning that their diet is almost entirely composed of dead animals. This requires special adaptations; for example, vultures have bald or...

Western Screech Owl

Western Screech Owl

Western screech owls are a small species of owl common throughout the West. They are closely related to their eastern counterpart, the Eastern Screech Owl, but make different vocalizations. Contrary to their name, western screech owls don’t actually make a...